2018 Report

Case study: Wildlife migratory corridors and dispersal areas in Kenya

The wildlife migratory corridors and dispersal areas study (Ojwang' et al., 2017) is part of the flagship project on securing wildlife dispersal areas and migratory corridors of the Vision 2030 of the Kenyan government.

In Kenya, wildlife populations have declined dramatically over the last few decades, while human-wildlife conflict has been increasing. In order to reverse this trend, there is an urgent need to assess and secure Kenya's wildlife dispersal areas and migratory corridors. This study focuses on mapping these areas in order to develop a Conservation Connectivity Framework to facilitate the design of a strategy for protecting the wildlife present in human and livestock dominated landscapes. Eight globally threatened keystone mammal species were selected, and a total of 110 migratory routes and corridors were identified in the southern and northern Kenya rangelands and coastal terrestrial ecosystems.

Wildlife migratory routes/corridors and threats in the Amboseli Ecosystem. Source: Ojwang' et al. (2017)

Almost all the wildlife dispersal areas and migratory corridors in the Kenya rangelands have been impacted to some extent by human activities and some are highly threatened. The main threats to habitat connectivity are incompatible land use in wildlife areas, such as crop cultivation; large human settlements; fences; mining; deforestation; wetland drainage; high-density livestock presence; and poaching.

To address these impacts, the study makes the following recommendations:

  • Develop, expand and implement the proposed Conservation Connectivity Framework by establishing a collaborative and transparent consultative process;
  • Identify, prioritize and secure wildlife dispersal areas and migratory corridors through a prioritized scheme;
  • Promote integrated land use for spatial planning that takes into account all social, economic, biophysical and natural resources;
  • Review policies and legislation related to land use, wildlife conservation, forestry, water, and agriculture;
  • Promote community participation in biodiversity conservation;
  • Implement an effective management of wildlife dispersal areas and migratory corridors through research and monitoring systems, and in collaboration with stakeholders;
  • Source and provide the necessary resources for conservation connectivity management; and
  • Carry out monitoring and evaluation to ensure effective management.

Pplive2018 Box12 Fg1

Wildlife migratory routes/corridors and threats in the Amboseli Ecosystem.

Source: Ojwang' G.O., Wargute P.W., Said M.Y., Worden J.S., Davidson Z., Muruthi P., Kanga E., Ihwagi F. and Okita-Ouma B. 2017. Wildlife Migratory Corridors and Dispersal Areas: Kenya Rangelands and Coastal Terrestrial Ecosystems.